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Virtual Meetup: Data Analysis in Movement Ecology - Shared screen with speaker view
Talia Speaker
24:12
Hi everyone, thanks so much for being here today! Feel free to say hello in the chat - let us know why you’re interested in this topic and where you’re joining from. We’ll get started in a few minutes
Ellie Warren
24:45
Hi everyone! I’m Ellie from WILDLABS. - excited to see all of you here to chat about movement ecology!
David Savage
25:14
Hi everybody--I'm David Savage, finishing up my PhD at Purdue University and I'm here in part because I think it's interesting and in part because I'm in the middle of applying for a postdoc working on movement ecology and want to get more up to date on it.
Sareach Chea
25:32
Hi everyone! I'm Sareach from Cambodia. It great to join the training
Tony Jiang
27:14
Hi, I'm Tony from Portugal. I am a data scientist and am interested in what new developments there are in ML and conservation
Lars Holst Hansen
27:45
Hi everyone! I am Lars from Denmark, tracking muskoxen and arctic foxes in Greenland!
Ukarapo Mungunda
27:51
Hi everyone, my name is Ukarapo from Namibia. Excited to be here and learn more about data analysis.
Serre Sandrine
27:58
Hello! I'm Sandrine from France and I'm curretnly working on movement and behaviour ecology of porbeagle sharks
Leslie A Paige
28:04
Hello! I am a PhD student at Washington University in St. Louis studying lemur movement ecology
Todd Myers
28:08
Todd from Washington state in the U.S. I am an environmental researcher studying the application of environmental technology.
Emma Vogel
28:15
Hi everyone-- Im Emma a PhD Studend in Troms
Dibyendu Biswas
28:19
hi, I am Dibyendu from India. working on movement ecology of old world vulture in India, both residents and migratory species.
Rebecca Hodgkiss
28:20
Hi everyone. I'm Becky Hodgkiss joining from the UK. I work in offshore wind, providing advice to developers on how to assess the impacts of offshore wind on seabirds. I am interested in how advances in tracking technology can help fill evidence gaps and better inform these assessments.
Tuğçe Nur İlbaş
28:23
Hello everyone, I'm Tuğçe from Istanbul/Turkey. I'm a master's student and I am interested in migration of bats and bat conservation.
Sara Beery
28:24
Hi! I'm Sara, just about to finish a PhD at Caltech in computer vision and interested in movement data as a component of multimodal biodiversity monitoring systems!
Carolyn Dunford
28:30
Hi All, I'm Carrie joining from Cape Town. I work with camera trap, GPS and accelerometer data to quantify animal energetics in the wild (mostly large carnivores!)
Robin Sandfort
28:33
Hi there, Robin from the Austrian Woods. Lot´s of wildlife movement data around here ;-)
Rick Jordan
28:54
Hello there! Rick Jordan, system administrator for the St. Louis Zoo, in St. Louis, MO, USA. We have several projects in the works and this discussion is relevant :)
Felipe Bufalo
29:09
Hi everyone! I am Felipe Bufalo, from Brazil. I am currently studying wild black lion tamarins’ movement and decision making processes during my PhD 🙂
Shir Bar
29:11
Hi everyone! Shir from Israel, doing my PhD at Tel Aviv university in computer vision and zoology, mainly interested in fish movement and behavior 🙂
Ross Tsai
29:15
This is Ross from Taiwan. I am studying migratory ecology of Chinese Sparrowhawk, and habitat use and movement of Australasian Grass-Owl.
Nick Porter
29:17
Hello everyone, I am Nick Porter a Fisheries Scientist from Idaho. I work tracking Chinook salmon in the Pacific Northwest to monitor habitat use and survival. I am interested for a chance to cross train and learn from other researchers.
Sankarshan Rastogi
29:34
Hello, This is Sankarshan from India. I currently work with WWF-India on Grasslands and Ungulates. My recent inclinations towards Animal behaviour and movement bring me here!
Oorjit Mahajan
29:38
Hey I’'m Oorjit , a high school student based out of India. I am an aspring social entrepreneur looking forward to utilise technology for environmental impact and conservation . Looking forward to having an enriching experience ahead !
Emmanuel Lourie
29:41
Hi! I'm Emmanuel from Israel. Working with ATLAS (reverse-GPS) and fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) in Israel. Final year PhD. Excited to be here.
Tobias Petri
29:42
Hi, Tobias here from the Firetail team from Unterhaching, Germany (Tracking and Acceleration Analysis software)
Lisa Davenport
29:52
Hi everyone, Lisa Davenport, from Cedar Key, Florida and associated with UF Gainesville and sometimes James Cook in Cairns, Australia. I study intra-tropical migrant birds, mostly in South America. About to publish some data, so looking at what newest analyses are.
Scott Yanco
30:02
Hi All! Scott Yanco, postdoc at the Max Planck - Yale Center for Biodiversity Movement and Global Change
Kenady Wilson
30:19
Hi! I'm Kenady in the USA. I'm a data scientist and product manager at Wildlife Computers. Lots of telemetry data from all sorts of critters over here :)
Frank van der Most
30:34
Good day from Costa Rica. I am starting a company on data, database applications for nature conservation. See https://rubberbootsdata.com
Robin Jones
30:37
Hi, Robin from the UK. I'm interested in interpreting accelerometer data in gps trackers to show behaviour on interactive maps.
Fernanda Paschotto
30:50
Hello! I’m Fernanda from Brazil, and I'm starting my Masters with Movement Ecology of the Lear’s Macaw, an endangered species endemic to the Caatinga Dry-forest in Brazil
Emma Vogel
30:52
Hi everyone-- Im Emma a PhD student in Tromsø Norway. I use biotelemetry to study the influence of multi-scale divers on top-predator predator movements and behaviours
Dimitri Giunchi
31:05
Hi everyone, I'm Dimitri a researcher from the University of Pisa. I study migratory ecology of several wader species
Andrew Fairbairn
31:35
Hi everyone, Andrew from Munich Germany. Researching urban biodiversity and green infrastructure.
Vanessa Süßle
31:36
HiI am Vanessa from Frankfurt Germany.I just finished my master thesis (Data Science) which was on the individual identification of leopards from unlabeled video data, in which I also used the Mega Detector and DeepLabCut and other components.Maybe a future PhD student, if the proposal gets funded for the topic AI in wildlife conservation.Curious to learn more and meet people ;)
Giacomo May
31:36
Hi, I'm Giacomo: Computer Science Student from Munich, Germany. Very interested in computer based solutions for conservation and movement ecology
Samuele Ramellini
31:45
Hi all, I'm Samuele, a Master student at the University of Milan in Italy. I study foraging and non-breeding ecology of the Lesser kestrel, a small colonial raptor
Antonio Ferraz
32:22
I'm António Ferraz, with JPL at Pasadena, CA. I'm a Remote Sensing scientist interested in integrating remote sensing of habitats with animal movement data. Also, currently working on a project that focuses on the gaps in current tag tracking technology and seeks to identify new tech to fill those gaps.
Calandra Stanley
32:49
Hello, I'm Callie a postdoc in the US. Studying bird migration
Benjamin Bar-Gera
33:27
Hi all! I'm Beni Bar-Gera, a master student at the University of Applied Sciences in Zurich, Switzerland, focussing on wildlife management and modeling mammal behavior based on acceleration data.
David Savage
34:59
Good luck Sara!
Talia Speaker
35:10
Our WILDLABS AI queen!
Rob Appleby
35:14
All the best for next week Sara!!
Wouter Vansteelant
35:16
Nice introductions. I am Wouter Vansteelant, previously mostly studying migration behaviour of various birds of prey in relation to atmospheric processes. Recently started a postdoc at University of Groningen (Netherlands) where I’ll use bio logging data to study how Spoonbills and Godwits cope with rapid changes in wetland habitats along the East-Atlantic flyway.
Angie Michaiel
35:56
Hi all, I’m Angie, a neuroscientist at The Kavli Foundation. I’m doing my own horizon scanning to understand the state of movement ecology and find potential places we can merge ecology and neuroscience. Always happy to speak about this topic if anyone is willing!
Stephanie O'Donnell
36:13
Amazing Angie!
Neil Hammerschlag
36:17
Hi all. Please to be here. I’m Neil Hammerschlag from University of Miami. Focused on movement and behavioral ecology of marine apex predators. https://linktr.ee/DrNeilHammer
Rob Appleby
36:44
I love that the graph starts in the BC!!
Ellie Warren
37:42
Hi all! Don’t forget to drop your questions for speakers right here in the chat - we’ll call on you during the discussion when it’s your turn!
Mackenzie Mathis
38:23
Hi everyone! I’m a prof that works at the intersection of neuroscience, engineering and computer science - joining you from Geneva,🇨🇭🏔
Angie Michaiel
39:12
Thank you for DLC, Mackenzie 😄
Fadia Al Abbar
39:22
Hi all, pleased to be here. I am studying dolphin responses to tourism activities filmed with a drone in Sao Miguel, the Azores, and were working on tracking dolphin movements. I am a PhD student in Wageningen University, the Netherlands. https://azoresdelphisproject.wixsite.com/project
Mackenzie Mathis
39:27
🙏 you’re so welcome!
Rob Appleby
40:16
challenge accepted!
SILVIA ZUFFI
43:07
Hi all, my name is Silvia, I work on 3D animals from a computer vision perspective, from Italy
Christian Rutz
43:51
The STRANGE framework for mitigating sampling biases in, and improving the generalisability of, animal behaviour research applies to bio-logging studies. We are currently working on an article that explains how/why -- please reach out if you want to find out more. https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-01751-5
Fadia Al Abbar
44:29
Hi Svenja, I remember you! Great to see you here!!!!! Hug Fadia
Talia Speaker
45:24
Thanks for sharing Christian! Christian’s also on our advisory committee for the project :)
Dennis Kim
47:03
Hi all, my name is Dennis Kim, a PhD student at U of Minnesota from Fieberg lab, focusing on how to quantify the effects of memory in animal movement
Kenady Wilson
47:57
Sara, can you put that email address in the chat?
David Savage
48:05
We've got a decent framework for incorporating physiological data (eg heart rate) with gps tracking for humans--just ask anybody doing endurance sports; to what extent are folks doing this in the movement ecology space?
Tobias Petri
48:06
Great introduction, thank you
Sara Beery
48:15
aiforconservation@gmail.com
Abby Benson
48:15
Yes I also need the email.
Vanessa Süßle
49:12
aiforconservation@gmail.com
Rob Appleby
49:20
David, how are you attaching the sensors for hearrate monitoring?
Talia Speaker
49:22
Awesome intro thanks Sara!
Lars Holst Hansen
49:40
The CERES wildlife tag https://cereswild.com/ is another new example using realtime analysis. Used by Giraffe Conservation Foundation https://giraffeconservation.org/
David Savage
50:35
Rob, I'm talking about things like smartwatches, fitbits, etc. I'm not a movement ecology person, but I am an endurance athlete and a brief google scholar search didn't reveal a lot in that space for wildlife at least that I found so I was hoping to learn more.
Teague O'Mara
51:46
Hey David. There are a number of us working on incorporating heart rate into animal movement -- the biggest limitation for us is usually having to implant heart rate loggers or send them through the digestive system. It's hard to keep HR sensors on animals in a place where they will stay still & keep working -- but it would be amazing if there have been advances on this.
Rob Appleby
52:01
Ok cool, I've had some friends deploy fitbits on animals with mixed results. It's a good idea though. I wonder if others have used something different (or the same) with greater success?
Talia Speaker
52:34
For folks interested in AI we also have an AI for Conservation group on WILDLABS - check it out here: https://www.wildlabs.net/groups/ai-conservation
Lars Holst Hansen
53:11
@David try searching for the StarOddi HR monitor or Vectronic FIWI rumen sensor
Talia Speaker
53:27
We also have an AI Office Hours program set up for one-to-one support for conservation scientists from leaders in the field, coming back later this year: https://www.wildlabs.net/community-announcement/ai-conservation-office-hours-2021-review
Teague O'Mara
53:47
Star:Oddi are amazing!
David Wolfson
53:56
Depends on how big and 'hearty' your study species is. See this study implanting aftermarket HR loggers into black bears: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40317-018-0157-z
Lilian Musembei
54:37
hi everyone, I'm Lilian Musembei. just graduated my masters degree in animals genetics and breeding, university of Nairobi, Kenya . passionate about research and wildlife conservation. interested in pursuing my PhD , though yet to get a scholarship. any help will be highly appreciated . Linnetmusembei@gmail.com here to learn more
Alexandra DiGiacomo
55:01
Hi all, I'm a PhD student at Stanford studying large predator movement ecology and data science. I'm working to synthesize remote sensing and biologging techniques to understand spatiotemporal habitat partitioning across age classes in Pacific white sharks. Thanks for the great presentation, Sara!
Rob Appleby
55:06
Hi Lars, good to see you again. I see the Star Oddi is an implant...that usually limits what it can be used on, at least in my experience...
Rob Appleby
56:05
Great visualisations!
Lars Holst Hansen
56:52
@Rob oh yes! Lots of limitations! The rumen sensor is only meant for ruminants ;)
Carolyn Dunford
57:14
@David Savage, it also depends why you want to monitor heart rate - if it is to study "fitness" or physiology then it probably needs to be an implant but if you're looking to measure energy expenditure, activity intensity, or behavioiur then accelerometers can do a better job
Rob Appleby
57:18
It's quite a small looking implant though, relatively speaking...
Rob Appleby
58:54
Ok phew...I was wondering what animals are regularly moving at >150km/hr!
Hannah Tiffin
59:40
Hmm so could these types of interactive diagrams and analyses be used to determine potential transmission routes and contact rates with animal diseases…?
Talia Speaker
59:44
Rob it’s lovely to have your commentary back we missed it last event
Joanna Turner
59:54
Hi all, I am a machine learning engineer with Global Fishing Watch. I am interested in developing resources to support bycatch research. Thank you for these great talks.
David Savage
59:56
yeah I'm just thinking of how easy it is for me to generate something like a TCX or GPX with a spatial track, plus things like temperature, heart rate, power, cadence, etc. If we can do this for people we should be able to figure out a way to do it for wildlife.
Rob Appleby
01:00:20
Thanks Talia!
Teague O'Mara
01:02:22
Man, ORTEGA looks awesome!
Rob Appleby
01:03:17
I agree! A bit more sophisticated than GPS Visualizer (no offence GPS Visualizer)!
Lars Holst Hansen
01:03:25
@David yes it should be possible but the modern light sensor based HR watch monitors are optimised for rather naked human skin - and then there is the HUGE question of power consumption. How often do people c´charge the GPS watches? Solar power or other forms of energy harvesting could be a neat thing to help.
Rob Appleby
01:04:56
David, I saw a video on Youtube that showed a perpetual power generator that used magnets and crystals and it seemed pretty convincing to me, so maybe we could use that for power?
David Savage
01:05:15
sounds like a great plan Rob, I'll put in a grant to the NSF to try it. You want to be on the proposal?
Rob Appleby
01:05:27
Ok great!
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:05:41
The quality wildlabs collaboration we love to see
David Savage
01:06:06
ancient aliens were the real tech for wildlife all along
Rob Appleby
01:06:09
😄
Rob Appleby
01:06:41
Pyramids...all tracking devices should be shaped like pyramids!
Ellie Warren
01:07:10
We’ll save screen caps of this conversation for when you guys win an award for revolutionizing science
David Savage
01:07:23
👍
Teague O'Mara
01:07:28
A miniaturized perpetual power generator? Jump on the DARPA gravy train for that one 🙂
Rob Appleby
01:08:47
I feel ashamed looking at the quality of these graphs!
Nick Porter
01:11:09
I agree Rob these graphics have been fantastic.
Ran Nathan
01:11:39
Thanks Somi for this great talk and for developing ORTEGA and your other contributions not shown today. BTW, our figure illustrating how resolution affects inference from movement data was published in Science (not Nature), see https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.abg1780
Robin Sandfort
01:11:48
Some of our Austrian red deer projects used the FIWI rumen sensors. It´s quite tricky to make them swallow the bolus. They were just to big for my small roe deer ;-)
Somayeh Dodge
01:13:16
@Ran! Thanks so much for your comment and for correcting me! Of course.
Lars Holst Hansen
01:13:53
We have used the FIWI with mixed succes on muskoxen. Some of them spit out the sensor! We are planing to develop a new device to deploy it.
Eilidh Smith
01:14:08
Hi Robin - having spent most of the winter trying to dart red deer from the ground, that sounds very appealing! What sort of information do you get from the FIWI rumen sensors?
Robin Sandfort
01:16:27
@Lars The weight of the Bolus just has to be right to stay at the correct place in the rumen.
Lars Holst Hansen
01:17:48
our plan is to place it in the rumen with a tube BEFORE they wake up and need to swallow it
Rob Appleby
01:17:51
Christen, when you say cross validation, is that using actual data from the bear collar (or some other movement/detection data)?
Somayeh Dodge
01:18:17
Apologies for talking so long!
Robin Sandfort
01:18:35
Hi @Eilidh lots stuff. The rumen temperatur gives you info on feeding (colder forage) and core body temperatur (energy saving in winter etc). plus the heartbeat
Neil Hammerschlag
01:18:37
@Christean: Where do we find the tools to run these analyses?
Teague O'Mara
01:18:40
I'm happy for Chris to get into the mathematical mud for me.
Todd Myers
01:18:43
No apology necessary. it was interesting.
Rob Appleby
01:18:54
your stuff was amazing Somayeh!
Somayeh Dodge
01:18:55
https://move-ucsb.github.io/covid19-mobility-vis/
Francesca Belem Lopes Palmeira
01:18:57
Lovely tapirs!!!
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:18:58
No no! @somayeh, it was fantastic!
Somayeh Dodge
01:19:12
Dynamovis: https://github.com/move-ucsb/DynamoVis
Somayeh Dodge
01:19:26
Thank you all!
Talia Speaker
01:19:28
Yes all good Somayeh! Thanks so much for the interesting talk, we’ll get to discuss more in the open chat part
Rob Appleby
01:19:43
phwoar that's pretty powerful stuff!
Somayeh Dodge
01:20:42
I was happily watching the clock on my screen saying 8:47, and thinking cool I have more than a minute left. Not knowing that the clock was showing the time 8:47 am!! 🙂
Martin Leclerc
01:20:57
Question for Chris: Do you think we could inform stochastic movement process between GPS locations with other sensors on the animal (like accelerometers and heart rate monitor) to be able to derive the most probable complete track?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:21:19
We are hearing from Motus next call!
Rob Appleby
01:21:19
ah MOTUS! noice!
Eilidh Smith
01:21:21
Thanks Robin, I'm looking at disturbance so GPS and accelerometer tech pretty advantageous (but incredibly difficult to deploy in UK), but I wonder if body temperature could indicate flight responses i.e. if they are running, their temperature would go up...
Daniel Palacios
01:21:51
@Neil: GitHub page for the ctmm package: https://github.com/ctmm-initiative/ctmm
Ran Nathan
01:22:11
Christen, would this important distinction between modeling movement as discrete or continuous in time vanishes once movement is collected at high spatial accuracy and temporal frequency?
Lars Holst Hansen
01:23:15
@eilidh bear in mind the FIWI measure HR during resting state https://www.vectronic-aerospace.com/heart-rate-logger-fiwi/
Robin Sandfort
01:23:32
@Eilidh That was exactly idea: Lots of disturbance = higher movement rate = higher heartrate and body temperature = more energy needed in the snowy Austrian alps
Rob Appleby
01:24:07
speaking of accelerometers and complimentary sensors has anyone experimented with dead reckoning? I've been interested in for years, but not aware of much in our fields...
Sara Beery
01:24:57
100% re: extracting more scientific insight from the data we have!
Lisa Davenport
01:25:11
Thank you - I LOVE CTMM!
Nick Porter
01:25:18
Thank you Christen
Teague O'Mara
01:25:18
Rory wilsons group has been working on dead reckoning in birds, but a magnetometer is needed, too
Lars Holst Hansen
01:25:21
@Rob nope! It seems like you need quite a high fix rate for correction. The upcoming snapper GPS might be nice for that
Teague O'Mara
01:25:29
you can check out the R package Gundog.Trakcs
Carolyn Dunford
01:25:32
@Rob check out the work of Rory Wilson - his lab in Swansea does loads on dead-reckoning on wildlife and is a great human if you want advice/ collaborations
Teague O'Mara
01:25:37
https://animalbiotelemetry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40317-021-00245-z
David Wolfson
01:25:38
https://movementecologyjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40462-015-0055-4
Aurora Donatelli
01:25:53
@Chrusten: what kind of models you suggest to integrate accelerometer data and movement data (e.g., GPS), HMM?
Rob Appleby
01:26:12
oooh yeah, point and click!
Talia Speaker
01:26:26
https://biology.umd.edu/movement
Eilidh Smith
01:27:11
@Robin - amazing, will look out for your pubs
Rob Appleby
01:27:21
Thanks @Carolyn!
Teague O'Mara
01:27:22
Chris -- continuous ACC needs a lot of memory. What sampling rate do you think is minimum?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:28:05
Ran you’ll be next!
Lisa Davenport
01:28:53
Just a comment - we used ctmm in a 2021 article modeling Blue-throated macaws (Critically threatened, so we haven't released the data on breeding ground locations), and it was easy to use even for our R-challenged team
Hannah Tiffin
01:28:57
Has that comparative analysis of home range estimates been published? Link?
Tobias Petri
01:29:42
@Teague: this really depends on the questions you are asking. Tags typically start from 8Hz and higher, but for wing frequencies and similar questions you will likely need higher rates
Roland Kays
01:30:23
@Hannah here's the big HR comparison paper https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ecm.1344?casa_token=ZTSMfz8riaEAAAAA%3ALgq-3jRDVSItnjOVT1rum0UMc8bngPjRaHXOgiPPdGuFxr56M_drhg403GyHW-OY2ZIqoyuaL8CqFmM
Hannah Tiffin
01:30:56
@Roland, perfect thank you so much!
Roland Kays
01:31:08
This is a great recent ‘practical guide' to HR estimates as well https://ecoevorxiv.org/23wq7/
Rob Appleby
01:31:23
OOHEEE Gunner, R et al. (2021) . . . How often should dead-reckoned animal movement paths be corrected for drift?
Rob Appleby
01:31:28
bedtime reading!!
Hannah Tiffin
01:32:43
@Roland, this review looks super useful, thank you for sending!
Tobias Petri
01:33:16
if you require acceleration visuals & segmentation with the possiblity to interactively refine predictions you may want to look into Firetail http://www.firetail.de -- in particular for large scale, high res data
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:33:23
Just so everyone is aware - we also include a link on wildlabs where you can access the chat after the call
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:33:56
So if you need to look back later at resources/links etc, you can access it there.
Lars Holst Hansen
01:34:48
I can highly recommend http://www.firetail.de !
Francesco Garzon
01:35:36
Hi @Christen, thank you for your talk! I was wondering how would you create a HR for a species that has one clear foraging location, and one separate roosting location, with limited locations connecting the two? I have had issues where one large HR is created, despite many data points at the two separate locations. Thank you!
Dibyendu Biswas
01:35:56
no sound
Christen Fleming
01:35:59
Here are some websites for ctmm and ctmmweb: https://movementoflife.si.edu/analytical-tools/ https://biology.umd.edu/movement https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/ctmm/index.html https://github.com/ctmm-initiative/ctmm https://github.com/ctmm-initiative/ctmmweb https://groups.google.com/g/ctmm-user
Rob Appleby
01:36:53
uh oh...back to Teams...
Rob Appleby
01:39:05
no joke, that's exactly what my kitten looks like!
Rob Appleby
01:39:52
man, this is going to put a lot behaviour caoding software in the bin!
Christen Fleming
01:39:53
All of the models in ctmm are technically HMM models. The models I think would be necessary for integrating accelerometer would be continuous-acceleration models (slightly more complex than the continuous-velocity models in ctmm) and need to be coupled with behavioral switching models, like from Blackwell's group. I have some mathematical results in mind that would make implementing these models computationally efficient (without MCMC).
Ellie Warren
01:39:57
Rob, we want to see the kitten and analyze its behavior!
Talia Speaker
01:40:34
Here’s the DeepLabCut community page: https://gitter.im/DeepLabCut/community?at=5dd30a1ac26e8923c44c2acf
Rick Jordan
01:40:38
Awesome stuff, thank you.
Christen Fleming
01:41:17
I think the minimum ACC sampling rate depends on the time interval of the animal's stride (or flapping) and also on the scale of the errors.
Rob Appleby
01:41:24
I would like to know why he loves to attack me all the time so I am keen @Ellie
Sarah Davidson
01:41:37
As a general resource: CTMM, FireTail, DynamoVis, and a bunch of other tools for tracking/bio-logging data are summarized https://www.movebank.org/cms/movebank-content/software
Aurora Donatelli
01:42:06
@Christen: wow thank you so much! I will have some literature search to do
Talia Speaker
01:42:19
Ooh that’s awesome thanks Sarah
Francesca Belem Lopes Palmeira
01:42:48
Nice talk!!!
Tobias Petri
01:43:17
Really enjoyed your talk @Christen -- you guys are doing an amazing job at pulling these relatively complex models to an inuitive level!
Tony Jiang
01:44:06
For the 3D model of the cheetah running did you need to use multiple cameras in order to get the 3D representation of the cheetah moving through space?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:44:11
Seconding that Tobias! You also explained it all so clearly, I really appreciated it. I was so worried I would have to concentrate really hard to understand 10% of what you would talk about!
Vanessa Süßle
01:44:23
The cheetah model partly worked on wild leopard data from camera traps in my project :)
Christen Fleming
01:45:40
With a bi-modal home range, there are usually two associated movement behaviors, which implies a non-stationary process. Long term, I would like to tackle data like that with behavioral switching models. Short term, I would consider classifying the data (foraging versus roosting), calculating two separate stationary estimates, and then averaging them together with a hierarchical model (all possible now in ctmm).
Ran Nathan
01:47:10
inspiring talk, Mackenzie! Obviously two of the major limitations to apply these tools for wildlife in the wild are short duration and limited spatial coverage. What would be your most optimistic solutions for these limits (i.e. longest in time and largest in space) in the next 1-2 years?
Rob Appleby
01:47:48
Mackenzie for your ID success do you need something reasonably well marked, like a zebra, or can any animal be ID'd?
Lars Holst Hansen
01:47:51
These models are awesome for captive animals like in enclosures in zoos or for farm animal monitoring - but isn’t it of quite limited use for wild animals spending only very little time in front of video cameras?
Alexandra Childs
01:48:36
That was so interesting thank you
Serre Sandrine
01:48:37
@Christen, I'm dealing with coarse resolution data in both space and time and I'm wondering how far I can dig into my datasets with mathematical tools used at higher resolution. (12 hours / 50km to more)
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:50:10
Not that I dont think yours were interesting rob and lars!
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:50:24
I think ran covered your lars to a degree
Rob Appleby
01:50:26
I get the hint Steph...
Christen Fleming
01:50:53
You can feed coarse data into ctmm and nothing will go wrong, because the autocorrelation model is selected. You just won't be able to estimate quantities like speed and possibly diffusion rate. That's important, though, because conventionally you would just proceed with dividing straight-line distance by time and calling that a speed estimate.
Sara Beery
01:52:16
Rob in my experience and in lots of discussions with the WildMe team, biomarked (striped, spotted, contoured) species are easier to ID and the methods are deployable now, for less clearly marked species there has been some good progress and promising results but the biggest barrier I see is the challenge of building good evaluation sets for species that are hard or impossible for humans to re-ID, because without that we can't tell if our unsupervised or semi-supervised methods are trustworthy
Talia Speaker
01:52:17
So many interesting questions - if we don’t get to yours or you’d like to continue the conversation hop over to our Biologging group on WILDLABS: https://www.wildlabs.net/groups/biologging
Lars Holst Hansen
01:52:31
Good points! It could be very valuable in ground truthing acc data for instance
Mackenzie Mathis
01:52:57
@Vanessa — cool!!
Rob Appleby
01:53:17
Well, I am sufficiently blown away once again!!
Mackenzie Mathis
01:53:21
@Rob — no, we show that we can reID even black mice without any markings
Rob Appleby
01:53:51
whoa! @Mackenzie...that's really exciting!
Lisa Davenport
01:53:52
I can totally see using this on giant otters (that have individual throat marks) to improve our estimates of which subadult is sharing with young-of-the-year. Sometimes you get a ½-second glimpse of a small section of the throat before the share is complete and the otter giving the food away re-submerges. Want to try this with some ancient video 🙂
Talia Speaker
01:54:16
Thanks all so much for being here today! For those who have to run, make sure to register for our next event on Data Sharing & Archiving in movement ecology on May 25: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/virtual-meetup-data-sharing-archiving-in-movement-ecology-tickets-337552026197
Serre Sandrine
01:54:26
Thank you very much @Christen, I might a bit more questions on the use of ctmm and how to be enough cautious in interpretation!
Lisa Davenport
01:54:28
Really neat and amazing!
Talia Speaker
01:55:03
Sarah Davidson at Movebank (also on our advisory committee) will be giving the intro for that one, should be a super interesting follow-up to this conversation
Allert Bijleveld
01:55:29
Thanks for the wonderful talks!
David Savage
01:55:33
This is a huge obstacle to collaborative work--just fixing the bad incentive structures of academia. Thanks for emphasizing it Sara.
Rob Appleby
01:55:41
stupid granting bodies and Unis requiring data silos!
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:55:42
Agreed!
Ellie Warren
01:55:59
Thanks for coming along, everyone! Make sure you visit our brand-new WILDLABS platform to meet the conservation tech community and continue these conversations! https://www.wildlabs.net/
Abby Benson
01:56:07
Woohoo Sara! That's what I'm excited about too. Can't wait to discuss that more at the next meeting ☺️
Mackenzie Mathis
01:56:10
I didn’t talk about it today, but for joint modeling of data, we have worked on this for continuous time series data —> cebra.ai
Talia Speaker
01:56:12
We also just launched our new WILDLABS platform so go check that out as well :) Recording will be posted there soon too! www.wildlabs.net
David Savage
01:56:21
Researchers: 'let's do collaborative work and share our data'Universities: 'But what if we can MONETIZE this???!?!?!?'
Emmanuel Lourie
01:56:30
@Makeckenzie - Such a valuable tool! Is there a group-size limit to your method? Can we, for example, potentially track many roosting bats/birds?
Rob Appleby
01:56:39
EXACTLY @DAvid!
Rob Appleby
01:56:45
It drives me crazy!
Robin Sandfort
01:56:46
I was so lucky to start my roe deer studies
Robin Sandfort
01:57:01
with the Wonderful https://eurodeer.org/
Ellie Warren
01:57:04
And if you’re interested in sharing your expertise in discussions like these, make sure you check out our Groups and get involved! https://www.wildlabs.net/groups
Shir Bar
01:57:39
Thanks everyone for the inspiring talks!
Mackenzie Mathis
01:57:41
@Emmanuel - no limit; just pixel resolution of the animals 🙂
Mackenzie Mathis
01:57:47
Just need to be able to see them 🙂
Nick Porter
01:57:50
Thank you to all the speakers.
Mackenzie Mathis
01:58:10
Of course, there are limits to DL approaches (see our primer Mathis 2020 Neuron)
Rob Appleby
01:58:11
Thanks to all our speakers (including Talia)!
Lisa Davenport
01:58:12
THANKS - all the talks were very inspiring
Francesca Belem Lopes Palmeira
01:58:13
Nice talks! thank you everyone
Robin Sandfort
01:58:14
Thanks for the great and inspiring talks!
Hannah Tiffin
01:58:15
Thank you for organizing this and to all the speakers for such interesting talks!!
Courtney Shuert
01:58:16
Thank you to the speakers for all the amazing talks!
Talia Speaker
01:58:23
Ha thanks Rob!
Todd Myers
01:58:26
Thanks very much.
David Savage
01:58:28
thanks for a great event all!
Frederic Leymarie
01:58:30
thanks
Amie V
01:58:30
Thanks everyone!!
Thiago Couto
01:58:33
Thank you
Serre Sandrine
01:58:33
Thanks to al speakers