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WILDLABS Virtual Meetup: Low-Cost, Open-Source Solutions - Shared screen with speaker view
Roman Eyholzer
28:51
HiI'm Roman from Porini Fooundation in Switzerland working mainly on blockchain for nature
Thomas Starnes
28:59
Hi everyone, I'm a Senior GIS Analyst with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (Birdlife partner in the UK).
Akiba Wang
30:23
Hi everyone
Rob Appleby
31:04
Hi y'all, Rob Appleby here...excited for this one!
Akiba
31:20
Hi Rob. Nice to virtually meet you :)
Rob Appleby
31:31
You too Akiba!
Alasdair Davies
31:54
Hi everyone. Thanks for joining.
SONG Liu
32:26
Hi everyone, Liu Song from WWF China, working on Technology and Environment.
Gert Hamberg
33:14
Hi I am a producer of Prowild wildlife detection systems
Leslie Birch
33:52
Hey, I'm Leslie Birch from Philadelphia-US. Working on Master's in Conservation Tech and love Arduino! :)
Hannah Khwaja
33:53
Hi all! I'm Hannah, Field Conservation Assistant at Chester Zoo, UK
Caitlin Black
34:11
Hello! I’m Caitlin, a postdoc at the University of Zurich, researching elephant behavior using survey images among other things.
Nobesuthu Ngwenya
34:16
Hello, I am Nobesuthu Adelaide Ngwenya, Ecologist - Zimbabwe Parks
Akiba
34:40
Hi. I'm Akiba from Hackerfarm and FreakLabs. Everyone sounds like they're doing such interesting things :)
Talia Speaker
34:50
https://www.wildlabs.net/resources/community-announcements/wildlabs-virtual-meetup-recording-networked-sensors-security-and
Vickie DeNicola
34:56
Hi, Vickie DeNicola with White Buffalo … we do applied research and management projects.
Talia Speaker
34:59
https://www.wildlabs.net/resources/community-announcements/wildlabs-virtual-meetup-recording-next-generation-wildlife
Talia Speaker
35:06
https://www.wildlabs.net/resources/community-announcements/wildlabs-virtual-meetup-recording-big-data-conservation-dec-12th
Benjamin VanderVelden
35:16
Ben Vander Velden - Denver, CO - no professional link at the moment, just passionate about technology and conservation.
Tanya Berger-Wolf
35:20
Tanya Berger-Wolf from University of Illinois at Chicago and Wildbook @ Wild Me is here. Looking forward to everyone’s presentations and the followup discussion
Laure Joanny
35:41
Hi, I'm Laure Joanny, I'm a doctoral researcher currently working on the developement and impact of monitoring technologies for conservation law enforcement
Vance Russell
35:51
Hi Everyone, Vance Russell from Ecosulis
Niklas Jordan
36:02
Hej Hej everyone, Niklas from Northern Germany here. I am Technology advocate and studying Earth Science. Besides I am blogging about conservation technology: https://blog.niklasjordan.com/conservation-technology/
Rob Appleby
36:14
Hi Vance!
Alexandra Dumitrescu || WWF Romania
36:18
I’m Alexandra - coordinating the team for funding opportunities for Panda Labs - an innovation open experiment built on top of the WWF network
Joanna Turner
36:30
Hi all, I am a postdoc at Loughborough University, UK, looking at applying machine learning algorithms for visual recognition. I am interested in wildlife conservation.
Mate Zec
36:44
Cheers, Mate Zec from Biom (BirdLife Croatia). We do a lot of GPS tracking of bird movement, as well as sound recording and drones for monitoring the extent illegal killing of birds
Laurent Andriantsiferana
36:48
Hi Everyone I am Laurent Andriantsiferana, IOT Architect at CIsco, supporting Animal Conservation projects
Stephanie O'Donnell
38:32
Really great to meet everyone! Fantastic to hear all your different backgrounds :)
Sarah Newnham
38:36
hi! i’m sarah. i work as a software engineer for an ecommerce company in south africa. looking to get into opensource conservation tech
Stephanie O'Donnell
39:53
More info about mataki here: http://mataki.org/
Stephanie O'Donnell
40:34
Great thread from Yvan about lesson learnt from mataki lite here: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/573
Stephanie O'Donnell
40:48
and here: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/574
Stephanie O'Donnell
41:30
The questions al just mentioned are what we summarised from your registrations to this meet up: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/698
Stephanie O'Donnell
43:05
A recent update about the sea turtle tag: https://www.wildlabs.net/resources/case-studies/update-arribadas-low-cost-open-source-sea-turtle-tag
Nick Salafsky
43:32
Hi - this is Nick Salafsky with Miradi Software. Interested in underlying creating data standards to enable info exchange to support conservation work....
Pauline Pham
46:37
Hi all! I am Pauline - R&D engineer at Sigfox Foundation. We have developed a rhino tracker to allow rangers to monitor and protect them to avoid poaching
Rob Appleby
46:54
Thanks Alasdair!
Leslie Birch
47:05
Was Alasdair at GOSH in China?
Akiba
47:11
Great presentation Alasdair
katiezacarian
47:35
This is Katherine Zacarian from Planetary Health Solutions. We are developing implantable tracking tags for Great Apes. Thank you everyone. katie@planetaryhealthsolutions.org.
Akiba
47:51
They are open source hardware for scientific equipment
Akiba
48:09
http://openhardware.science/
Stephanie O'Donnell
48:13
Ah! Thanks akiba
Leslie Birch
48:26
OK TY Alasdair :)
Talia Speaker
49:01
Thanks Alasdair!
Aurelie Shapiro
49:05
hi I'm aurèlie and I am trying to launch PandaSat! a satellite constellation for nature tracking, with support from Wildlabs tech hub!
Rob Appleby
49:23
many many questions for Alasdair a little later!
Akiba
50:07
https://www.openrov.com/
Stephanie O'Donnell
50:19
Arg you were quicker than me! Thanks :)
Akiba
50:40
oh sorry. will hand the chat links to you :)
Stephanie O'Donnell
51:05
ha, not at all, please continue :D
Leslie Birch
55:38
I would love some way to connect with everyone on this call. First time I'm with people exactly in my interest field.
Stephanie O'Donnell
56:17
Definitely - I’d recommend joining this thread: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/698
Stephanie O'Donnell
56:40
but we can discuss that in the bigger group - how to connect/collaborate
Akiba
56:49
I think there are a lot of APIs that are available. I think open source by definition is source code availalbe and reproducible
Alasdair Davies
57:37
Definitely agree. A good breakdown of what a platform needs to achieve.
Tanya Berger-Wolf
58:42
Open source is more than just open an available source code. It means well engineered code base to which others can contribute. It means a well supported code base, versioning and testing.
Akiba
01:00:17
I agree. I think open API is maybe developer friendly, but not open source.
Shashank Srinivasan
01:02:02
Thanks Alasdair and David, fascinating discussion so far.
Leslie Birch
01:02:25
Here is the opportunity for the Trident grant program David mentioned: https://openexplorer.nationalgeographic.com/see
Rob Appleby
01:02:44
Thanks Leslie
Akiba
01:02:44
It's mainly semantics though. I've worked in both realms and I think everyone/company has their own path
Aurelie Shapiro
01:02:51
are you open source but also a for-profit company? Or non-profit?
Tanya Berger-Wolf
01:03:53
We are a non-profit and open source. Today, even big tech giants like Google and Microsoft are going open source on many of their solutions
Rob Appleby
01:04:17
How does everyone feel about the tension David menitoned re: profit and conservation?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:04:29
excellent question.
Joe Nash
01:04:47
> Today, even big tech giants like Google and Microsoft are going open source on many of their solutions
Joe Nash
01:05:15
Google & Microsoft are in fact the biggest open source contributors on GitHub.com, at the moment!
Rob Appleby
01:05:21
tech companies benefit enormously from open-source...
Tanya Berger-Wolf
01:05:23
I think conservation tech is poorly funded and many of the organizations that need to use tech have no funding for it and the foundations prefer to give money for actual field work rather than supporting conservation tech
Alasdair Davies
01:05:27
Arribada is a C.I.C - Community Interest Company which is a not for profit (UK) that legally reinvests funds to support the development of open conservation tech.
Rob Appleby
01:05:55
C.I.C is a great model
Joe Nash
01:06:15
If you’re in the US, a B Corp is a good alternative: https://bcorporation.net/
Akiba
01:06:36
I think profit is very important for open source projects because financial sustainability is needed for longevity. But i think there are multiple paths to strike a balance
Rob Appleby
01:08:06
B Corps get an A+ from me!
Akiba
01:08:23
Thanks Tanya. That's an important part. I think the tech needs to be a part of the conservation work. The funding should go to the conservation work, but the tech is part of it
katiezacarian
01:09:28
We’ve had some success with funding from Conservation X Labs for early seed funding for R&D: https://conservationx.com/
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:10:16
Which was your project, Katie?
Joe Nash
01:10:23
The funding for field work vs tech work reminds me a lot of the Roads and Bridges report, which was a report on sustainability of “digital infrastructure”, i.e. the open source projects that run the world. It makes the point that digital infrastructure is often invisible and doesn’t attract as much funding: https://www.fordfoundation.org/about/library/reports-and-studies/roads-and-bridges-the-unseen-labor-behind-our-digital-infrastructure/
Alasdair Davies
01:12:03
That’s a great report - recommend it too.
Talia Speaker
01:13:12
Cool thanks for sharing Joe
Akiba
01:13:20
Gonna drop this here just in case it's needed:https://www.wildbook.org
Gert Hamberg
01:14:22
We are working on species recognition software and are starting a pilot within the coming months. perhaps thats a solution to process all that visual data
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:15:12
Gert- what application are you looking at? Any species/sort of data in particular?
Gert Hamberg
01:15:56
We are going to implement it in our wildlife detection system especcialy designd for otter and deer
Gert Hamberg
01:16:12
we can also use it for fish
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:16:29
Ah! Anywhere we can find out more?
Vickie DeNicola
01:16:45
definitely interested in ungulate solutions …
Gert Hamberg
01:17:00
its brandnew, the brochures still need to be made :D
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:17:19
Tanya just mentioned rolling it out to elephants - a need more than one community member has flagged: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/618
DAMIAN OTIENO
01:17:33
At Ol Pejeta,through the Conservation Technology Lab, we have have just installed some WPS covert cameras which are able to identify species, vehicles etc.
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:17:45
Ha! Far enough - please do share on WILDLABS when you have more info available
katiezacarian
01:17:50
the technologies powering Wildbook is so fantastic. Have you considered using it to verify instances of illegal wildlife trafficking online?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:18:03
Good question - I’ll ask Tanya
Gert Hamberg
01:18:06
Okay I will
Meredith Palmer
01:18:08
I work with camera trap networks across Africa and our team has implements some machine learning to use in conjunction with citizen science - works well for ungulates!
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:18:50
Is that through zooniverse Meredith - you’re with snapshot serengeti aren’t you?
Meredith Palmer
01:19:30
Yes! I'm also working with WildCam Gorongosa and a number of smaller sites across South Africa. We've got a developer who has been integrating AI into our classification systems.
katiezacarian
01:19:49
how do nature photographers and tourists engage with Wildbook to contribute their media to the braintrust? For example, have you reached out to Instagram — (I have contacts if you’d like)
Meredith Palmer
01:20:04
Here's the GitHub: https://github.com/marco-willi/camera-trap-classifier
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:20:15
Awesome, thanks!
Gert Hamberg
01:20:42
I will check that also meredith tx
Talia Speaker
01:20:45
Chimpface is one example of using machine learning to look at wildlife trafficking online/ via social media: https://www.wildlabs.net/resources/case-studies/chimpface-facial-recognition-combat-wildlife-trafficking
Rob Appleby
01:22:11
Tanya, do you have error rates or detection probabilities associated with your counts, or are they considered a census?
Niklas Jordan
01:24:58
Will be there an recording of this meetup and will the slides be published?
Talia Speaker
01:25:20
Niklas - yes! They will be shared within a week
Talia Speaker
01:25:27
The recording, not sldies
Talia Speaker
01:25:32
*slides
Niklas Jordan
01:25:35
Great :-)
Talia Speaker
01:25:48
But we will also include notes on presentations and main questions/ take-aways
Akiba
01:25:49
Wow, that's fascinating. Never thought images would be used by poachers as well as scientists.
Caitlin Black
01:26:09
Tanya, in your opinion, is it feasible to create algorithms to extract even more specific data from the images for each individual? For example, the size of individuals or other traits such as age?
Rob Appleby
01:26:37
Thanks Tanya
Akiba
01:27:15
That was a great talk. Thank you, Tanya.
Shashank Srinivasan
01:28:12
That was amazing, thanks Tanya.
Pascal Hirsch
01:28:13
@Tanya: Are the WildBook algorithms and models + coefficients open source?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:28:27
Literally the question I was going to ask, pascal
Akiba
01:29:45
Azure is the cloud service by Microsoft.
Shashank Srinivasan
01:29:52
Can Wildbook also be used to identify wildlife from top-down aerial imagery (as opposed to ground-based?)
Joanna Turner
01:30:58
@Caitlin: There are currently algorithms that are estimating age for humans, so with a good enough quality image, in theory, it should be possible to do the same with animals that look significantly different as they age.
Thomas Starnes
01:31:03
Have you come across Wildlife Insights? Is there an appreciable difference between Wildlife Insights and Wildbook?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:31:52
Thomas - excellent question.
Rob Appleby
01:31:56
any concerns about deep fakes (e.g. poachers spoofing images of individuals to make it look there are more than there are or specific individuals are still alive when they aren't)?
Alasdair Davies
01:32:11
Wildlife Insights is focusing on camera trap images and processing of data (inc video)
Shashank Srinivasan
01:32:20
Right, that makes sense, thank you; we're planning some drone-based river dolphin surveys in North India later this year and being able to ID individuals from above would be ideal.
Vickie DeNicola
01:32:38
Do the animals need to have unique marks (e.g., tail notches, spots) or can facial structure be used ?
Caitlin Black
01:32:39
Thanks @Joannna, I have a paper in press showing that age can be estimated based on morphological features in elephants. Would be wonderful to automate it and scale it up!
Nobesuthu Ngwenya
01:32:43
Thank you Tanya for the great presentation. Can researchers have separate accounts on wildbook to manage their own data and research?
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:32:47
Oh shashank - you should talk to Marcello. He’s doing drone based river dolphin surveys in brazil
Pascal Hirsch
01:33:31
@Tanya: Does "Open source" also include the pre-trained models?
Laurent Andriantsiferana
01:33:40
Tanya, with trained model, can we consider deploying this in distributed low-power device with camera ? something like rpi+gpu ?
Akiba
01:36:53
I totally sympathize. Preparing a release takes a huge amount of time and effort.
Nigel B
01:36:57
From my perspective the limiting factor to open sourcing our hardware is the time resource required to write up/provide the tech support etc. Also its very much about paper output and to get things peer reviewed then the 'tech' often goes obsolete/becomes outdated (3yrs?)before publishing. This happened with Mataki. Should Wildlabs be the place to get stuff out as there seem to be many options??
Alasdair Davies
01:37:06
+1 Akiba
Stephanie O'Donnell
01:37:11
+ 1 nigel!
Joanna Turner
01:38:26
I believe the model architectures are detailed in some published papers, so in theory it should be reproducible. See https://oar.princeton.edu/jspui/bitstream/88435/pr13m5n/1/Animal_Detection_Pipeline_for_Identification_2018.pdf
Alasdair Davies
01:38:28
I would say WIldlabs + a sustainable income (various methods) to fund the core team that isn’t reliant on the core team having to run the support so they can focus on the product
Pascal Hirsch
01:38:51
@Stephanie: Yes, totally!
Pascal Hirsch
01:40:30
@Tanya: And please note that I am fully aware that it is much easier to ask someone else to open their source than it is to actually do it yourself...
Rob Appleby
01:40:34
So WILDLABS comprising ~2000-3000 people right? That's a pretty big company-equiv...I see something like a NASA model, having core teams working on projects with very wide support
Guy McCaldin
01:44:00
I think a big component of it is the fragmentation between the different communities. Having a central place to communicate is critical.
Pascal Hirsch
01:44:07
Could not agree more!
Akiba
01:44:24
I agree on a centralized community.
Leslie Birch
01:45:18
Yes, central place needed.
Pascal Hirsch
01:46:27
@Tanya, @Rob: Isn't that what the typical GitHub model is about? No project is forced to accept any particular contribution, but everybody is free to contribute and improve the project by creating their own synchronised copy ("fork").
Rachael Kemp
01:46:38
A central place would be great to avoid replication but I think there is the problem of the current funding model, as mostly the wheel is reinvented due to people having to fundraise for themselves and the short timeframes. What is the best way to avoid that?
Tanya Berger-Wolf
01:46:41
@nobesuthu: Yes, researchers can have separate accounts that will access only to their data. In fact, in Flukebook, charged by NOAA, we are implementing pretty sophisticated data sharing agreements among researchers
Talia Speaker
01:48:40
Conversation on open source projects here: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/679
Rob Appleby
01:48:57
Hi Pascal, I think the problem with GitHub, is the project has already been done and resources poured into before realising 100 other people have similar repos...
Rob Appleby
01:49:23
plus it's really passive
Leslie Birch
01:50:38
If you can't maintain on Github, at least having a link for your project and description would be good. Lots of people check Github first before starting projects.
Akiba
01:50:40
You definitely need to have strong boundaries and the ability to say no if you lead an open source project
htarold
01:50:41
https://mikemcquaid.com/
Talia Speaker
01:50:59
Is this the one Joe? Mike McQuaid’s blog: https://mikemcquaid.com/
Joe Nash
01:51:00
https://mikemcquaid.com/2018/03/19/open-source-maintainers-owe-you-nothing/
Joe Nash
01:51:02
yep!
Talia Speaker
01:51:04
:)
Joe Nash
01:51:07
I’d recommend starting with that post
Pascal Hirsch
01:52:18
Rob: Sorry, not sure I get you: It seems to me that not putting a project on GitHub right at the start, the danger you mention only increases...
Joe Nash
01:52:21
This is also really great for those of you looking to start/grow your project: https://mikemcquaid.com/2018/08/14/the-open-source-contributor-funnel-why-people-dont-contribute-to-your-open-source-project/
Joe Nash
01:53:45
@Rob:
htarold
01:53:47
The title of the meetup was "low cost, open source solutions" but it doesn't seem low cost any more!
Joe Nash
01:53:58
oops. @Rob, “plus it's really passive” what do you mean by passive?
Pascal Hirsch
01:54:10
Absolutely agree that organising / maintaining open source projects is hugely important and can (and often does) take a lot of effort. I think this is where public funding could come in.
Rob Appleby
01:54:15
Maybe I think of GitHub a bit like R (stats env), where generally projects are most of the way developed before it's posted, although obviously not always. I can see you point though.
Akiba
01:54:25
I think for open source hardware, it's important to understand the manufacturing side of things
Rob Appleby
01:55:17
I agree Akiba!
Akiba
01:57:17
I also think its pssible to have a business model that works for open source hardware. Typical margins at open source companies like Adafruit and Sparkfun are devices and parts are sold at around 3-5x BOM cost. The devices are still reasonably priced and companies are able to survive, matain, and support their efforts
Pascal Hirsch
01:57:59
@Tanya: I agree that there are lots of things to consider, particularly around sharing sensitive data. But I do think that SAAS is definitely _not_ open source.
Rob Appleby
01:58:36
Yeah Sparkfun and Ada are great examples of getting it to work...
Akiba
01:59:06
Actually I helped LadyAda set up her first assembly line :)
Rob Appleby
01:59:14
nice!
Tanya Berger-Wolf
01:59:16
@Pascal: I think there are levels of support. We open our code and if you don’t need our time to take it - great! But if you need engineering time to use our code then we think it’s fair to pay for that service
Leslie Birch
02:00:14
Akiba--I freelanced doing projects for Adafruit. Still a huge fan! :D
Pascal Hirsch
02:00:30
@Tanya: That sounds like an added-value-model - which is great to have in addition!
Akiba
02:00:45
I feel like researchers and techies speak different languages figuratively. I think there needs to be education, workshops, videos that can bridge both groups.
Tanya Berger-Wolf
02:00:52
@Pascal: yes
htarold
02:01:04
@Akiba I think so too.
Shashank Srinivasan
02:01:16
We've got philanthropic funding in India by demonstrating conservation impact not by developing new tech but by using off-the-shelf tech appropriately.
Rachael Kemp
02:01:22
Can we have a space on Wildlabs that is about discussing new ideas for collaborating for funding? Where people can feedback on potential ideas?
Stephanie O'Donnell
02:01:27
yes
Akiba
02:01:31
These virtual meetups are a good starting point to bring everyone together :)
Leslie Birch
02:01:43
@Akiba - GOSH (Gathering of Open Science Hardware) helps to do that bridging.
Stephanie O'Donnell
02:01:56
I’m so on board with that idea @Rachael - will follow up.
Rachael Kemp
02:02:44
:)
Akiba
02:03:07
@Shashank: In agriculture, we discuss the concept of "appropriate technology" a lot. A lot of groups try to throw IoT and drones to solve farming problems where the real work is in the distribution and logistics of the food
Pascal Hirsch
02:03:27
At the very first Open Hardware Workshop at CERN in 2011, there were companies saying that they were still very successful as a company although they fully shared all their hard- and software for niche scientific applications. Part of the argument was that if anyone is really interested in copying you, they will do so anyway - the difference would be just a few weeks at max. On the plus side, their expertise on their products would be so visible and evident that many customers would prefer to deal with them directly even more, even though there were cheaper knock-offs.
Gert Hamberg
02:04:11
@shashank. We are now working on a bat tracking device using adapted acoustic devices. We are now able to make flight routes of bats visual. So you are right to involve producers in specific projects/products
Shashank Srinivasan
02:04:28
@akiba yes exactly; in India half the job is telling people that they don't need to use drones!
Shashank Srinivasan
02:05:03
@gert that sounds great, where could I find out more about your work?
Pascal Hirsch
02:06:11
I absolutely agree that open sourcing a project _should_ absolutely not entail a commitment to provide support for it, however desirable that might be from someone else's point of view.
Gert Hamberg
02:06:42
@ shashank This project is also still ongoing and brandnew. We can keep in touch and you can find my contact info at www.prowild.net
Tanya Berger-Wolf
02:06:50
@Thomas Starnes: yes, we are talking to Wildlife Insights. We were at the inaugural meeting
Guy McCaldin
02:07:04
It's very easy to fall into the technology trap, while ignoring the larger picture. Conservation is inherently linked to communities. Finding solutions that integrate into their skills and values is very important for successful outcomes.
Pascal Hirsch
02:07:35
Who is that - working on bat tracking?
Stephanie O'Donnell
02:07:43
Gert I think?
Rob Appleby
02:07:50
Pascal, we are interested in various versions of available tech., from DIY from source code etc., then PCBs, to kits, to custom products. It's a time vs money equation for many people...
Gert Hamberg
02:07:51
Me indeed
htarold
02:08:15
@Gert where can we read more about bat tracking?
Pascal Hirsch
02:08:39
Stepanie: Thanks - is it somewhere on the web?
Tanya Berger-Wolf
02:08:44
@Laurent Andriantsiferana: yes, we are talking to Intel and Amazon about it. It’s a cutting edge research question of how to do it right
Leslie Birch
02:09:03
@Gert's info was posted up higher
Gert Hamberg
02:09:33
still in development Htarold. We expect to do a trial later this year
Pascal Hirsch
02:10:06
Rob: Sounds great. I would love to see this space thrive!
Rachael Kemp
02:10:41
A map of all the players and the tech they're working on would also be super helpful for roadmapping and collaboration
Rob Appleby
02:10:43
I agree Pascal. And there's space for all forms of systems
Leslie Birch
02:11:12
@Rachael +1000
Gert Hamberg
02:11:13
For those who are interested you can leave your contact info on my website www.prowild.net so I can keep ypou posted on the progress
Guy McCaldin
02:11:26
That's a great idea Rachel
Stephanie O'Donnell
02:11:35
Gert - I recommend starting a thread on wild labs as well, so people can keep up to date
Talia Speaker
02:11:38
Thanks so much to our speakers and to everyone who showed up with great questions and enthusiasm!
Joe Nash
02:11:42
👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏
Talia Speaker
02:11:43
Recording and notes will be posted here: https://www.wildlabs.net/virtual-meetups-season-2
Pascal Hirsch
02:11:43
I hope we will find a good solution for resolving the obvious tensions between conservation interests, private and scientific interests, and possibly even commercial interests!
Talia Speaker
02:11:47
Jump over to this thread to continue the conversation now: https://www.wildlabs.net/community/thread/698
Rob Appleby
02:11:53
thanks so much everyone...kicking A!
Vance Russell
02:12:00
Thanks to WILDLABS and the speakers. Excellent webinar and chat!
Gert Hamberg
02:12:06
thats also a good idea stephanie
Leslie Birch
02:12:08
Yes, thanks so much everyone!
Rachael Kemp
02:12:13
Thanks speakers and organisers! Exciting stuff :)
Guy McCaldin
02:12:13
Extremely inspiring stuff
Mate Zec
02:12:15
Fantastic webinar and discussion, thanks everyone.
Meredith Palmer
02:12:17
Thanks everyone!
Shashank Srinivasan
02:12:29
Thanks everyone, and thank you for organising this Steph! Really enjoyed this:)
Akiba
02:12:29
Yes, it was great to hear and also virtually see everyone live. Thanks everyone!
Pascal Hirsch
02:12:30
Thanks everyone!
Dominic Goodwin
02:12:30
Well done!!! Thank you
Rob Appleby
02:12:30
thanks Talia and Steph